tabletop-sports.com

APBA Saddle Racing Update

Articles / Board Games
Posted by jdowneyadmin on Jan 31, 2003 - 07:46 PM

Gary Stishan posted this at Delphi:


Guys,


Just thought I'd post some info about my Saddle Racing project based on the APBA Saddle Racing Board game.
I have finished the 2001 horse card set a few months ago along with supplements for the 1975 and 1976 seasons APBA created. Send an e-mail for more info on these and other products.
Now to the PC version:
I have finally finalize a simple setup routine that will install the PC version. It is being tested as we speak.
If all goes well, things may heat up in another month or two.




After a long rest my clip artist is back in full swing and has created a short APBA Downs track. It is just about 5 Furlongs (F) long and straight.
I am in the process of rating some All-Time great QuarterHorses for the short track. I hope to have
between 40 to 48 horses carded.
All Quarterhorses will have sprint style cards.


In order to duplicate the great burst of speed these horses possess, I've created two new ratings.
Right now I'm calling them Start and Finish.
Yea, I really thought LONG and HARD about those names. Of course, the names are subject to change without notice between now and then.
Each Rating will be rated between 0 to 3 with 3 the best.
The two rating will give the horses a boost for out of the gate and the home stretch of a short 2 to 4 furlong race.


Here is a sample chart to use for the rating:
0 = No change to the result read off the horse card.
1 = columns (11-36) subtract 0 from result, columns (41-66) subtract 1.
2 = columns (11-26) subtract 0, columns (31-46) subtract 1, columns (51-66) subtract 2.
3 = columns (11-26) subtract 1, columns (31-46) subtract 2, columns (51-66) subtract 3.


For example Shue Fly might be rated a 1 for start and a 3 for the finish.
If Shue Fly rolls a 42 out of the gate and the result is a 24, we would subtract 1 from 24 and look up result 23 on the race action board. If Shue Fly rolled a 55, we would not change the result number.
If Shue Fly rolls a 33 in the home stretch (last game turn of the race) and the result is a 23, we would subtract 2 from 23 to get 21 but actually look up result 22 on the race action board. Note: Since the best sprint number is result 22 we would not use a 21 but stop at the best result of 22 and use it.


As you can see, Shue Fly can really finish strong at the tail end of the race, just like in real life.


If these ratings work out for the Quarter horses I might try using them for Thoroughbreds too. Humm, just think what Secretariat's ratings would be.


I already have the PC version running races on the APBA Downs short track. I am hoping to be able to release this Add-on for the board gamers too complete with the short track too.


We are also working on some race tracks from across the pond. Yes, I learned that term from some weary travelers at the APBA convention this past summer! Here's the scoop.


My clip artist has finished Epsom and Salisbury. He is working on Ascot now. All the tracks can be used for
both the board game as an Add-on and the PC version. If you know anything about racing, you know that the 3 tracks just
mentioned look nowhere near like an USA oval. This created a real challenge for me to get the PC version to
know what the heck these tracks actually look like and get them little markers to run in the right I mean left oh well, some direction. So far, I have Epsom in the PC game. Races are now being tested
on that race course. During the researching of Epsom we've found that this course also has some interesting terrain features. The 12F start has the horses
climbing a hill to the far turn then level off till they reach Tattenham Corner where there is a sharp decline until they get to the
straight away. Again it levels out until the horses get about 50 yards (That's 2 spaces in APBA language for you non saddle racing fans) from the finish line. The horses are greated to a steep
grueling climb to the finish line. It is said the winner of this race is of Hall of Fame Material. So why did I mention this? I've
added special terrain movement cost associated with the hills. For instance, it could cost the horse up to 2.0 movement points to move in either of the last two spaces before the finish line. Also, the sharp decline at Tattenham Corner could subtract .1 and .2 to from the standard 1 movement point to move into these spaces. As you can see, horses will loose speed and gain speed along this demanding course. When I said could, I mean the horses are rated for Endurance and a roll against endurance will tell how much it will cost the
horse to move through the special terrain spaces.


Now on to Salisbury. Why did we pick Salisbury, well because it has an interesting Loop in its course design. A 12F race starts and moves clockwise through a loop and back to where they originally started. Quite interesting to watch this race in Spectator Mode on the PC.


Now on to the best for last, Ascot. We created two versions of this track. One to run flat
races and one to well, we'll get to that later. For now the flat race course has 2 8F chutes. One, The Old Mile, horses must go through one corner before reaching the finish line. The other. New Mile, is a straight 8F to the finish line. It is one of the longest home stretch in the world, All 8 Furlongs! That's 1 mile in case it didn't sink in.
Of course, I've saved the really best for last. We also created a jump course for Ascot. Yes, we have rules and will be creating steeple
chasers for this course. The course is dotted with obstacles from simple fences to ferrous walls with ditches and streams on the back sides. These have bested both men and beast.


Each of the obstacles we've created for Ascot will be rated from A (Afterthought) to F (Fear in their eyes). While each horse will have an Endurance Rating similar to the rating I already give the Thoroughbreds and a Jump rating. If you didn't know, the Hunt races at Ascot could be as long as 3 to 4 miles. The Endurance rating will kick in as the race nears the 2 to 3 mile markers. The Jump rating will be used to see how well the horses and man can hurdle over the obstacles. So a tough obstacle, let's say a wall with a small stream on the other side, (maybe rated an E) has a horse trying to hurdle it with a Jump rating of 1, Humm, bet you can guess where that jockey is going to land! And he definitely will NOT be dry...


Anyway, it should be a fun course and of course we will try to make this an add-on to the board game as well.


Hope I didn't ramble too long but at least wet your interest again the the Saddle Racing game.


Gary Stishan...



This article is from tabletop-sports.com
  http://tabletop-sports.com/

The URL for this story is:
  http://tabletop-sports.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=3